In the Service of Human Life
Tree on a hill on a starry night
Applied Bioethics in stylized text
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In the Service of Human Life

Ethical Vaccines

Vaccines are highly regulated, carefully manufactured, peer and government reviewed, clinically tested formulations intended to prevent the spread of dangerous communicable diseases. They are composed of chemical and organic matter which, in concert, can reasonably prevent a patient from becoming ill or dying from a particular illness. After a vaccine is approved, it is continually monitored and studied to ensure safety.Read Article

Why Conscience Rights

Imagine you grew up in a family of butchers. For three generations, your family has operated a small but successful meat market in town, preparing and selling your fine meats. People travel from all over to buy your family’s meat products, and as a result of your family’s labors, your community is able to feed itself.Read Article

The Right to Another Person

Americans reject the notion that a person has a right to another person. This is most clearly illustrated in our morally correct judgement against slavery. Ironically, despite this rejection, there are many other areas of human activity that we accept as normal that rely exclusively on that right.Read Article

Vaccination & Parental Autonomy

Parents of young children are routinely faced with ethical decision making in the course of routine medical care, and the ethics of vaccination are a contentious topic right now. Every major medical organization in the United States recommends the vaccination of children on a set schedule that is regularly reviewed and updated based on ongoing research. There are however many parents who object to vaccinations. The question for every ethically minded parent must be answered in due time: “Should I vaccinate my child?”Read Article

Reversability

Does reversibility negate bioethical violation?Read Article

Proportionality

When we face challenging diagnoses, it can be hard to judge between artificially prolonging life and justly extending our life by overcoming illness. It’s good to apply a test of ordinary versus extraordinary means to a treatment, but there’s a secondary standard that may crystallize the right path forward. That standard is one of proportionality.Read Article

Religion & Bioethics

We’re all at fault for our polarized culture. In public and private debate, we retreat with haste to ad hominem attacks and identity politics, arguing against a point (or a person) instead of strongly advocating for our own view. One of most effective tactics is to claim that the opposing party is attempting to impose their religious beliefs on another. That argument is disingenuous on its face, because in all debate, one party hopes to convince the other of the merits of their worldview.Read Article

Moral Culpability in Vaccination

The organization Children of God for Life is an active proponent among people of faith for the vaccination of their children. In 2003, they wrote to then Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, who would become Pope Benedict XVI, and the Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith asking for clarification on whether or not Catholics could, in the course of practicing their faith, use the vaccinations for which there were no ethical alternatives. Two years later, the Congregation responded.Read Article

Tie Goes to the Runner

Baseball is an American tradition. There’s a great rule in baseball that helps umpires make the most difficult calls: tie goes to the runner.Read Article